Galaxies

 

Various galaxy images and galaxy clusters.  Taken with SCT 14" mostly at F5 or with 11 " Astrograph at F2.2

NGC891 Cluster

NGC891 Cluster

Stephans_Quintet

Stephans_Quintet

NGC7331 + Stephens Quintet

NGC7331 + Stephens Quintet

NGC3877 Final

NGC3877 Final

NGC2683

NGC2683

MergeMosaic_M31_stars_edited

MergeMosaic_M31_stars_edited

MergeMosaic_M31_nostars_edited

MergeMosaic_M31_nostars_edited

M106 Group

M106 Group

NGC6946

NGC6946

NGC4631 + NGC4656

NGC4631 + NGC4656

NGC4295

NGC4295

M81-M82

M81-M82

M82

M82

M81

M81

IC2575 Coddington Nebula 2020-04-26

IC2575 Coddington Nebula 2020-04-26

M65Group 2020-03-25

M65Group 2020-03-25

M82-reworked

M82-reworked

M33 (2)

M33 (2)

NGC507 Cluster

NGC507 Cluster

NGC3842 Cluster Inverted Marked

NGC3842 Cluster Inverted Marked

NGC3842 Cluster

NGC3842 Cluster

NGC3842 Cluster Inverted

NGC3842 Cluster Inverted

NGC4565

NGC4565

NGC4725

NGC4725

NGC3748 Copeland Septet

NGC3748 Copeland Septet

NGC3226_enlarge

NGC3226_enlarge

Leo 1

Leo 1

ARP117

ARP117

m51_2018-02-17_Ha_43x120

m51_2018-02-17_Ha_43x120

M51 taken in Ha only

ngc4565_final

ngc4565_final

NGC2403_final

NGC2403_final

Leo 1

Leo 1

perseus_cluster

perseus_cluster

M51_1600_240x5crop_ABE_neb

M51_1600_240x5crop_ABE_neb

ngc772

ngc772

M74

M74

M33_60

M33_60

M33_30_crop_ABE_neb

M33_30_crop_ABE_neb

NGC7332-7339

NGC7332-7339

NGC6946_ABE

NGC6946_ABE

NGC4725

NGC4725

ngc4725_edited_neg

ngc4725_edited_neg

ngc4725

ngc4725

NGC4565 (2)

NGC4565 (2)

NGC4565

NGC4565

NGC4565-5_edited_negative

NGC4565-5_edited_negative

NGC4565-5

NGC4565-5

M100_Cropped_DBE_a

M100_Cropped_DBE_a

M91-M88 Area

M91-M88 Area

M99

M99

AGC16556_invert_marked

AGC16556_invert_marked

Galaxy cluster - Approx 218 galaxies marked

AGC1656

AGC1656

Galaxy cluster. Inverted image to show faint galaxies.

AGC1656

AGC1656

Galaxy cluster

Virgo Cluster neg marked

Virgo Cluster neg marked

NGC4953

NGC4953

NGC4631-4656-4627

NGC4631-4656-4627

NGC2903_crop_DBE_final

NGC2903_crop_DBE_final

M101 Invert

M101 Invert

M101 final

M101 final

m82-edited

m82-edited

m66-group

m66-group

M51_RASA_20160331

M51_RASA_20160331

m44 Invert marked

m44 Invert marked

agc1646-neg

agc1646-neg

NGC3842_negative_marked

NGC3842_negative_marked

NGC3193 et al

NGC3193 et al

NGC3842

NGC3842

NGC3193 et al - stretched neg

NGC3193 et al - stretched neg

m105_group2

m105_group2

NGC5746-800-120x12

NGC5746-800-120x12

NGC3551-edited

NGC3551-edited

NGC3521-800-120x5-edited

NGC3521-800-120x5-edited

NGC3495-800-120x5-edited

NGC3495-800-120x5-edited

NGC3166-1600-120x5-edited

NGC3166-1600-120x5-edited

M104-800-120x5

M104-800-120x5

NGC1843-marked-neg

NGC1843-marked-neg

m31

m31

M31-North-400-240x5

M31-North-400-240x5

M31-400-240x3-enhanced

M31-400-240x3-enhanced

M31

M31

NGC1622-enhanced

NGC1622-enhanced

NGC7465

NGC7465

NGC7448

NGC7448

M74

M74

NGC772-800-240x5-edited

NGC772-800-240x5-edited

NGC891-800-240x10

NGC891-800-240x10

NGC5907-800-240x10.jpg

NGC5907-800-240x10.jpg

NGC 5907 is a spiral galaxy located approximately 50 million light years from Earth.[2] It has an anomalously low metallicity and few detectable giant stars, being apparently composed almost entirely of dwarf stars.[3] It is a member of the NGC 5866 Group. NGC 5907 has long been considered a prototypical example of a warped spiral in relative isolation. Then in 2006, an international team of astronomers announced the presence of an extended tidal stream surrounding the galaxy that challenges th

NGC7814-20150912-1600-120x10_cropped.fit.jpg

NGC7814-20150912-1600-120x10_cropped.fit.jpg

NGC7814-20150912-1600-120x10.jpg

NGC7814-20150912-1600-120x10.jpg

NGC7479-1600-240.jpg

NGC7479-1600-240.jpg

NGC7463-1600-240.jpg

NGC7463-1600-240.jpg

NGC7332-7339-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC7332-7339-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC7332-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC7332-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC6946-20150912-800-300x5-cropped.jpg

NGC6946-20150912-800-300x5-cropped.jpg

NGC6946-20150912-800-300x5.jpg

NGC6946-20150912-800-300x5.jpg

NGC185-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC185-1600-240x5.jpg

IC1494-1495 -20150911-1600-120x10.jpg

IC1494-1495 -20150911-1600-120x10.jpg

IC1392-1600-240x5.jpg

IC1392-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC6930-20150816.jpg

NGC6930-20150816.jpg

Contains NHC6828 & 6929. 5x240seconds F10 350mm SCT, Canon 60Da.

NGC7331.jpg

NGC7331.jpg

Stephans Quintet-large.jpg

Stephans Quintet-large.jpg

NGC4490-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

NGC4490-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

NGC4244-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

NGC4244-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

M94-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

M94-1600-120x5 2015-06-07

NGC5353-1600-120x5 2015-06-10

NGC5353-1600-120x5 2015-06-10

NGC4656-800-120x5 2015-06-10

NGC4656-800-120x5 2015-06-10

The Fish Hook galaxy

NGC4631-800-120x5 2015-06-10

NGC4631-800-120x5 2015-06-10

Whale galaxy.

M63-800-120x5 2015-06-10

M63-800-120x5 2015-06-10

ARP272-20150524-1600-120x10 UHC

ARP272-20150524-1600-120x10 UHC

High contrast image, galaxy cluster in Hercules ARP272. NGC6045, NGC6050.

ARP272-20150524-1600-120-10 UHC

ARP272-20150524-1600-120-10 UHC

Pushed processed, Visible galaxies. NGC 6043 NGC 6042 NGC 6039 NGC 6050 NGC 6054 IC 1172 NGC 6041 NGC 6040 NGC 6047 NGC 6045 NGC 6044 IC 1178 IC 1179 IC 1181 IC 1182 IC 1183 IC 1170 IC 1184 IC 1185

ARP272-20150524-1600-120-10 UHC

ARP272-20150524-1600-120-10 UHC

As previous image but with each galaxy marked. 54 in total. Verified against World Wide Telescope images.

NGC3432-1600-60x20.jpg

NGC3432-1600-60x20.jpg

Edge-on spiral in Leo Minor. NGC 3432 or Arp 206 was catalogued by Halton Arp as a galaxy with "material ejected from the nuclei." The disruption is presumably caused by interaction with UGC 5983, the dwarf galaxy to the southwest of NGC 3432. Redshift data gives a distance of 12 +/- 0.9 Mpc for the main galaxy and 14 +/- 1 Mpc for the interacting galaxy.

M51-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04-20

M51-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04-20

The Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194) is an interacting[7] grand-design[8] spiral galaxy with a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus[9] in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy.[10] Recently it was estimated to be 23 ± 4 million light-years from the Milky Way,[3] but different methods yield distances between 15 and 35 million ly. Messier 51 is one of the best known galaxies in the sky.

NGC507-3200-30-6 Group Marked.jpg

NGC507-3200-30-6 Group Marked.jpg

Very short test exposure of galaxy group. Push processed. Galaxies marked.See next deep sky image from web showing galaxies. (RA, Dec) center: (20.8485174537, 33.3223325243) degrees Orientation: 0.283191851265 deg E of N Pixel scale: 0.776763641207 arcsec/pixel Your field contains: NGC 494 NGC 506 NGC 504 NGC 510 NGC 498 NGC 503 NGC 501 IC 1684 IC 1686 HD 8347 NGC 495 NGC 507 NGC 508 NGC 499 IC 1685 IC 1687

NGC507-Arp 229 LRGB CCDStack and PS processed Annotated.jpg

NGC507-Arp 229 LRGB CCDStack and PS processed Annotated.jpg

See previous image.

NGC383-3200-20-6 group marked.jpg

NGC383-3200-20-6 group marked.jpg

Short test exposure of this group. (RA, Dec) center: (16.8411344265, 32.4162138888) degrees Orientation: 0.281736103198 deg E of N Pixel scale: 0.767989582538 arcsec/pixel Your field contains: NGC 390 NGC 370 NGC 373 NGC 372 NGC 387 NGC 386 NGC 379 NGC 385 NGC 384 NGC 383 NGC 382 NGC 388 NGC 380 NGC 375

M66-1600-60x10.jpg

M66-1600-60x10.jpg

Messier 66 (also known as NGC 3627) is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 36 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1780. M66 is about 95 thousand light-years across[3] with striking dust lanes and bright star clusters along sweeping spiral arms.[4] M66 is part of the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies that also includes M65 and NGC 3628.

NGC5846-3200-240x5.jpg

NGC5846-3200-240x5.jpg

NGC 5846 (UGC 9706) Group of Galaxies in Virgo NGC 5846 (bottom) is located at: RA 15 hours 07 minutes 07 seconds, Dec +01 degrees 32 minutes 39 seconds Includes NGC 5839 (UGC 9693) / NGC 5845 (UGC 9700) Size: N 5846 = 3.5' x 3.5' includes 1.3' x 1.1' / 0.8' x 0.5' / Class: N 5846 = E0-1 HII includes SAB(rs)0^ / E: / SB(r)b

NGC5033-1600-240.jpg

NGC5033-1600-240.jpg

NGC 5033 is an inclined spiral galaxy located in the constellation Canes Venatici. Distance estimates vary from between 38 to 60 million light years from the Milky Way Galaxy. The galaxy has a very bright nucleus and a relatively faint disk. Significant warping is visible in the southern half of the disk. The galaxy's relatively large angular size and relatively high surface brightness make it an object that can be viewed and imaged by amateur astronomers.

NGC4435 & NGC4438.jpg

NGC4435 & NGC4438.jpg

The Eyes Galaxies (NGC 4435-NGC 4438, also known as Arp 120) are a pair of galaxies about 52 million light-years away in the constellation Virgo. This galaxy takes its name from its ring structure which made it popular. NGC 4435 is a barred lenticular galaxy with a relatively young (age of 190 million years) stellar population on its central regions that has been discovered by the Spitzer Space Telescope and whose origin may be the interaction with NGC 4438.[1]

NGC4111-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC4111-1600-240x5.jpg

NGC 4111 is a spiral galaxy located roughly 50 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici. It is part of the Ursa Major South Group of galaxies, which is comprised of at least 32 large galaxies. Note galaxy at top and 2 further galaxies at bottom of page.

NGC3893-1600-300x4.jpg  2015-04-20

NGC3893-1600-300x4.jpg 2015-04-20

NGC3893/3896 is an M51-type interacting galaxy pair seen in the direction of the Constellation Ursa Major around 50 Million Light-Years distant. NGC3893 is a spiral galaxy, type Sc and NGC3896 appears to be a lenticular galaxy. There is a bridge of gas, dust and stars faintly seen between the two The pair has been studied for dark matter interaction and rotation characteristics between the two. Object: NGC3893/96 Distance: 50 Million Light-Years Magnitude: 11.6

NGC3877-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04-20

NGC3877-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04-20

NGC 3877 is a type Sc spiral galaxy that was discovered by William Herschel on February 5, 1788.[3] It is located below the magnitude 3.7 star Chi Ursae Majoris in Ursa Major.

NGC3628-1600-60x16.jpg 2015-04-20

NGC3628-1600-60x16.jpg 2015-04-20

NGC 3628, also known as Sarah's Galaxy,[3][4] is an unbarred spiral galaxy about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. It has an approximately 300,000 light-years long tidal tail. NGC 3628 along with M65 and M66 form the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies. Its most conspicuous feature is the broad and obscuring band of dust located along the outer edge of its spiral arms, effectively transecting the galaxy to our view.

NGC3268-1600-60x10.jpg 2015-04-14

NGC3268-1600-60x10.jpg 2015-04-14

(RA, Dec) center: (170.086072871, 13.5867951399) degrees Orientation: 0.14496329978 deg E of N Pixel scale: 0.454224760732 arcsec/pixel Your field contains: IC 2731 NGC 3628

NGC891-1600-30x10.jpg 2014-11-14

NGC891-1600-30x10.jpg 2014-11-14

NG891-1600-30x5.jpg 2015-02-02

NG891-1600-30x5.jpg 2015-02-02

NGC 891 (also known as Caldwell 23) is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6, 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster. It has an H II nucleus.[3] The object is visible in small to moderate size telescopes as a faint elongated smear of light with a dust lane visible in larger apertures. In 1999, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged NGC 89

NGC2903-1600-120-10.JPG 2015-04-02

NGC2903-1600-120-10.JPG 2015-04-02

Note additional small galaxy bottom right quadrant. Similar to other barred spirals NGC 2903 has been shown to possess a prominent nuclear star forming ring putting it in the class of so called "hot spot" galaxies, luminous galaxies that produce high rates of stars but falling short of the prototypical starburst galaxies. RA, Dec) center: (143.057206111, 21.4892318433) degrees Your field contains: Tycho-2 1409-1102-1 NGC 2905 NGC 2903

NGC3079-1600-120x4.JPG 2015-04-09

NGC3079-1600-120x4.JPG 2015-04-09

NGC 3079 is a barred spiral galaxy about 50 million light-years away, and located in the constellation Ursa Major. A prominent feature of this galaxy is the "bubble" forming in the very center (RA, Dec) center: (150.458274824, 55.6779808896) degrees Orientation: 0.18612354664 deg E of N Pixel scale: 0.512098712777 arcsec/pixel Your field contains: Tycho-2 3817-1158-1 Tycho-2 3817-1099-1 Tycho-2 3817-1218-1 Tycho-2 3817-994-1 HD 237858 HD 86661 NGC 3073 NGC 3079

M106-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04020

M106-1600-240x5.jpg 2015-04020

Messier 106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. M106 is at a distance of about 22 to 25 million light-years away from Earth. It is also a Seyfert II galaxy. Due to x-rays and unusual emission lines detected, it is suspected that part of the galaxy is falling into a supermassive black hole in the center.

M66-1600-60x10.jpg 2015-04-20

M66-1600-60x10.jpg 2015-04-20

Messier 66 (also known as NGC 3627) is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 36 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1780. M66 is about 95 thousand light-years across[3] with striking dust lanes and bright star clusters along sweeping spiral arms.[4] M66 is part of the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies that also includes M65 and NGC 3628.

M66-1600-120x10.jpg 2015-04-24

M66-1600-120x10.jpg 2015-04-24

Windy conditions.

M31-800-5x60.jpg 2015-01-31

M31-800-5x60.jpg 2015-01-31

300mm Telephoto lens. Causes distortion in colours in brighter stars.

NGC4762NGC4754-1600-240x5 2015-04-20

NGC4762NGC4754-1600-240x5 2015-04-20

Interacting, Nearly-edge-on, Barred Lenticular Galaxy aka PGC 43733, MCG 2-33-33, Uppsala 8016 Integrated Visual Magnitude: 11.3 Apparent Diameter: 7.6' x 1.8' Mean surface brightness: 22.8 mag/arc-sec2