Planetary Nebula

Some of the most vivid and yet sometimes very elusive objects.

M1 2022-01-05

M1 2022-01-05

M27

M27

Jones 1 Edited

Jones 1 Edited

Jones 1

Jones 1

M27_Final OSS

M27_Final OSS

M27_Final_Enlarge OSS

M27_Final_Enlarge OSS

M76 HSO edited

M76 HSO edited

M97 2020-03-22

M97 2020-03-22

M1 Clear 2020-03-25

M1 Clear 2020-03-25

M1 OSH 2020-03-25cropped

M1 OSH 2020-03-25cropped

M97-M108

M97-M108

Galaxy M108 and planetary nebula M97. Taken with 11" astrograph F2.2.

abel21

abel21

M46-1600-120x5

M46-1600-120x5

M76

M76

NGC7009

NGC7009

NGC2022-800-240x3

NGC2022-800-240x3

NGC7008-20150912-800-120x15-stretched.jpg

NGC7008-20150912-800-120x15-stretched.jpg

NGC7008-20150912-800-120x15.jpg

NGC7008-20150912-800-120x15.jpg

NGC6894-20150912-800-300x5.jpg

NGC6894-20150912-800-300x5.jpg

NGC6894-20150912-800-120x13.jpg

NGC6894-20150912-800-120x13.jpg

NGC6852-20150909-1600-120x9.jpg

NGC6852-20150909-1600-120x9.jpg

NGC6765-20150912-1600-120x9.jpg

NGC6765-20150912-1600-120x9.jpg

M27-20150816-kelner-stretch+.jpg

M27-20150816-kelner-stretch+.jpg

The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Apple Core Nebula, Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.The Dumbbell Nebula appears to be shaped like an prolate spheroid and is viewed from our perspective along the plane of its equator. In 1992, Moreno-Corral et al. computed that its rate of expansion in the plane of the sky was no more than 2.3" per century. From this, an upper limit to the age of 14,600 yr.

M27-20150816-kelner-stretch+neg.jpg

M27-20150816-kelner-stretch+neg.jpg

M27-OIII-1600-240x5.jpg

M27-OIII-1600-240x5.jpg

M2-15-20150916-3200-240x5-enhanced.jpg

M2-15-20150916-3200-240x5-enhanced.jpg

NGC6905-20150816.jpg

NGC6905-20150816.jpg

M27-20150816-contrast.jpg

M27-20150816-contrast.jpg

M27 2014-05-26.jpg

M27 2014-05-26.jpg

The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Apple Core Nebula, Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.The Dumbbell Nebula appears to be shaped like an prolate spheroid and is viewed from our perspective along the plane of its equator. In 1992, Moreno-Corral et al. computed that its rate of expansion in the plane of the sky was no more than 2.3" per century. From this, an upper limit to the age of 14,600 yr.

NGC7026-20150816.jpg

NGC7026-20150816.jpg

NGC6572 800-60x10.jpg

NGC6572 800-60x10.jpg

Emerald planetary in Oph magnitude 8.1.

NGC6826 - Blinking planetary in Cyg

NGC6826 - Blinking planetary in Cyg

From Wik - A distinctive feature of this nebula are the two bright patches on either side, which are known as FLIERs, or Fast Low-Ionization Emission Regions. They appear to be relatively young, moving outwards at supersonic speeds. According to Bruce Balick (University of Washington), "some of their observed characteristics suggest that they are like sparks flung outward from the central star late in the very recent past (a thousand years ago).

NGC6804 20150716 1600-120x6.jpg

NGC6804 20150716 1600-120x6.jpg

NGC6781 20150716-1600-240x8.jpg

NGC6781 20150716-1600-240x8.jpg

NGC6210 20150514.jpg

NGC6210 20150514.jpg

NGC7662 Blue Snowball 2014-08-05

NGC7662 Blue Snowball 2014-08-05

NGC 7662, also known as the Blue Snowball Nebula or Snowball Nebula, is a planetary nebula located in the constellation Andromeda. The distance to this nebula is not known with any real accuracy. According to the Skalnate Pleso Catalogue (1951) the distance of NGC 7662 is about 1,800 light years, the actual diameter about 20,000 AU. In a more recent survey of the brighter planetaries, C.R.O'Dell (1963) derived a distance of 1,740 parsecs or about 5,600 light years.

NGC1514  2015-02-06

NGC1514 2015-02-06

NGC 1514 is a planetary nebula that was discovered by William Herschel on November 13, 1790, describing it "A most singular phaenomenon" and forcing him to rethink his ideas on the construction of the heavens. Up until this point Herschel was convinced that all nebulae consisted of masses of stars too remote to resolve, but now here was a single star "surrounded with a faintly luminous atmosphere."

M57 Ring Nebula 2014-08-23

M57 Ring Nebula 2014-08-23

The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.[5] Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a red giant star, which was passing through the last stage in its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.

M97-1600-240x5 2015-04-20

M97-1600-240x5 2015-04-20

The Owl Nebula is a planetary nebula located approximately 2,030 light years away in the constellation Ursa Major.[2] This object is known by the catalogue identifiers Messier Object 97 (M97) and NGC 3587. It was discovered by French astronomer Pierre Méchain on February 16, 1781.[4] When William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse observed the nebula in 1848, his hand-drawn illustration resembled an owl's head. It has been known as the owl nebula ever since. The nebula is approximately 8,000 years old.

M1-120-120x19-edited3

M1-120-120x19-edited3

M1 800-30x5 2015-02-06

M1 800-30x5 2015-02-06

The Crab Nebula (catalogue designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. It is not, as its name might suggest, in Cancer. The now-current name is due to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse who observed the object in 1840 using a 36-inch telescope and produced a drawing that looked somewhat like a crab.[5] Corresponding to a bright supernova recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1054.

M1 Crab Nebula 2014-11-14

M1 Crab Nebula 2014-11-14

M1 Crab Nebula 2015-01-16

M1 Crab Nebula 2015-01-16

High contrast image.

NGC6894 2014-08-23

NGC6894 2014-08-23

NGC 6894 is a magnitude 12.3 planetary nebula in Cygnus. NGC 6894 is sometimes called the Diamond Ring Nebula, because the 14th magnitude star on the left of the nebula gives this planetary the appearance of a diamond ring when viewed through amateur size telescopes. NGC 6894 is located a little more than 6 degrees east of the Veil Nebula. NGC 6894 is a typical planetary nebula appearing as a ring of glowing gas similar to the Ring Nebula in Lyra. This small object is only about 0.9 arc-minutes